• Shakespeare and the Senses

    Author(s):
    Holly Dugan (see profile)
    Date:
    2009
    Subject(s):
    Sensory representations in literature, Renaissance English literature, Shakespeare, Early modern drama
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6J09W38G
    Abstract:
    his article examines recent critical approaches to Shakespeare and the senses. Historicizing the senses has posed certain methodological challenges: what is the relationship between subjective sensory perceptions and broader cultural understandings of sensation? Does the sensate have a history? Recent work on each of the five senses demonstrates that the answer is yes. And, surprisingly, Shakespeare and his literary works are at the center of the field. As an important figure of the English literary canon, yet one about whom we know so very little, Shakespeare's sensory archive is both omnipresent and illusive. Shakespearean sensations thus provide a way of grappling with the larger methodological stakes of this field. This article examines a wide range of critical approaches to Shakespeare's sensory archive and ends by considering possible paths for further research. Publication cover image Volume6, Issue3 May 2009 Pages 726-740 Figures References Related Information Metrics Details © 2009 The Author. Journal Compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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