• The Historicality of the King: An Exercise in Reading Royal Inscriptions from the Ancient Levant

    Author(s):
    Matthew Suriano (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    Ancient Near East, Biblical archaeology, Near Eastern Archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Levantine archaeology, Ancient Near East, Phoenicians, Aramaic, Historiography
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Royal Inscriptions
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6X921H9V
    Abstract:
    The problem with using royal inscriptions as historical sources is their inherent bias. The interests of the king drive the narratives of royal inscriptions. Yet this essential feature reveals their underlying concept of history. In royal inscriptions, historical thought is defined by the life and experience of the king. This article will present a hermeneutic for reading royal inscriptions that focuses on the individual king. The article will first look at the concept of historical time in epigraphic Hebrew and Old Aramaic sources before examining the complicated ways in which this concept is rendered in the principal genres of royal writings, the memorial and the dedicatory inscription. A survey of features found in memorial inscriptions from Dibon (the Mesha Stele) and Sam’al (Kulamuwa), followed by a study of the Old Byblian dedicatory inscriptions, will explore the complex process of configuring time and narrative around the king. In each genre of royal inscription, the linear time of the ruler intersects with cyclical traditions of kingship, revealing the historicality of respective king.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    6 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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