• Othello’s Jealousy: From Textual Crux to Critical Conundrum.

    Author(s):
    Michael L. Hays (see profile)
    Date:
    2012
    Group(s):
    Shakespeare
    Subject(s):
    Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616
    Item Type:
    Online publication
    Tag(s):
    Courtly love, editing Shakespeare, Intermediaries, Shakespeare
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6CR5NB87
    Abstract:
    Begins with the textual crux--Q's "you" and F's "he"--in Iago's question to Othello at III, iii, 96-7: "Did Michael Cassio/When [someone] woo'd my Lady, know of your love?" Q's reading is unanimously but silently adopted by all modern editors of the play, who take F as their copy text, on the assumption that F's reading makes no sense. Continues with a discussion of the role of intermediaries in courtly love, in other instances in Shakespeare, and in the case of "Othello." Shows that Iago's insinuation as a fact of Cassio's courtship the more specific and stronger prompt to Othello's jealousy. Explains Othello's jealousy in terms of his transformed perception of Cassio's role in his courtship of Desdemona and its altered meaning for him of his chivalric accomplishments, his honor, and her affections. Concludes by showing that F's reading made sense to Shakespeare, his company, and his audience; and, if F is taken as copy text, editors have no reason to emend it with Q.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Online publication    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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