• Homemakers, Communists, and Refugees: Smuggling Anti-Apartheid Refugees in Rural Lesotho in the 1960s and 1970s

    Author(s):
    John Aerni-Flessner (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Subject(s):
    African history, Border studies, Gender, Southern Africa, Women's history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Apartheid, Borderlands, Lesotho, Refugees
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M61Z41S1T
    Abstract:
    This article tells the story of Maleseko Kena, a woman born in South Africa but who lived most of her adult life in rural Lesotho. It narrates how her story of helping apartheid refugees cross the border and move onward complicates understandings of what the international border, belonging, and citizenship meant for individuals living near it. By interweaving her story with larger narratives about the changing political, social, and economic climate of the southern African region, it also highlights the spaces that women had for making an impact politically despite facing structural obstacles both in the regional economy and in the villages where they were living. This article relies heavily on the oral testimony of Maleseko herself as told to the author, but also makes use of press sources from Lesotho, and archival material from the United States and the United Kingdom.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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