• Aristotle’s Pambasileia and the Metaphysics of Monarchy

    Author(s):
    Carol Atack (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    Ancient Greece & Rome, Greek and Roman Intellectual History
    Subject(s):
    Aristotle, history of political thought, Ancient philosophy, Ancient Greek history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Ancient Athenian Politics
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M67P2Z
    Abstract:
    Aristotle’s account of kingship in Politics 3 responds to the rich discourse on kingship that permeates Greek political thought (notably in the works of Herodotus, Xenophon and Isocrates), in which the king is the paradigm of virtue, and also the instantiator and guarantor of order, linking the political microcosm to the macrocosm of the universe. Both models, in separating the individual king from the collective citizenry, invite further, more abstract thought on the importance of the king in the foundation of the polity, whether the king can be considered part of, or separate from, the polis, and the relationship between polis and universe. In addressing these aspects of kingship theories, Aristotle explores a ‘metaphysics of monarchy’, part of the long-running mereological problem of parts and wholes in the construction of the polis, and connecting his account of kingship to his thought on citizenship and distributive justice within the polis.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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