• A sensual philology for Anglo-Saxon England

    Author(s):
    Martin Foys (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Subject(s):
    Medieval studies, Medieval media studies, Old English literature, Anglo-Saxon literature, Sound studies, Philology, Material philology
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6HP12
    Abstract:
    What forgotten forms can philology assume anew? Reassessing how early medieval writers loved words differently than we do reveals significant gaps between past and presence senses of the physical phenomena words can index. In the early medieval language of Old English texts there remains a largely uncharted capacity for less linguistically driven aspects of expression, formed through a network of words, sounds, bodies and media: how the mute sound of a bell and the crook of a silent finger come together in medieval sign language, or how the Old English word for ring becomes a weeping, poetic gasp within a heaving breast. Such early medieval moments of communication survive because of language and in spite of language, and qualify the visualist framework through which we predictably reconstitute the medieval past, calling, /sotto voce/, for more than lovely words.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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