• John Boyle O'Reilly and Moondyne (1878)

    Author(s):
    Susanna Margaret Ashton (see profile)
    Date:
    2002
    Group(s):
    LLC 19th-Century American
    Subject(s):
    Australian literature, American literature, Irish literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Irish American History, australia
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6X554
    Abstract:
    Arrested for treason against the British Crown and deported to the penal colonies of Australia, the Irish revolutionary John Boyle O'Reilly managed to escape to the United States and within a few years became one of Boston's most prominent political and literary figures, one of the best known Irish immigrants in the United States and one of the most charismatic individuals of the late nineteenth century. He wrote some of the most popular poetry of the period as well as one obscure but swashbuckling novel, Moondyne (1878), based in part upon the spectacular events of his own life. O Reilly was a hero of national and international stature. His reputation, however, rested on more than his personal charism, staggering life history and notorious achievements as political activist and editor of The Pilor, the most influential Catholic newspaper of the nineteenth century. His clout truly stemmed from the way in which other Americans saw him as embodying a cultural role of conciliator, communicator, and cross-cultural ambassador.
    Notes:
    History Ireland, Volume 10, No 1. Spring 2002 pages 38-42
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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