• The Greening of Postmodern Discourse in Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake and Graham Swift's Waterland

    Author(s):
    Victoria Addis (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    American Literature, Environmental Humanities
    Subject(s):
    Ecocriticism, Postmodernism
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Nature-beyond-the-human
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6RV5G
    Abstract:
    In this article, I argue that the groundlessness associated with postmodernism is not as entrenched within its discourse as it may appear. Graham Swift’s Waterland (1992) and Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake (2003), while conforming to many of the aesthetic values of postmodernism, share an ecopostmodernist platform that raises questions and concerns about the human relationship with nature. In defiance of traditional notions of postmodernism, Atwood’s and Swift’s novels exemplify an engagement with ecological perspectives, and present conceptions of reality that do not accept disengagement or detachment as a suitable response to the so-called postmodern condition.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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