• Dauphine Was Right: Masques, the Authenticity of (Un)Performed Identity, and the Two Prologues of Epicene

    Author(s):
    Eric Dunnum (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    EMDC: The Early Modern Digital Collaboratory, Performance Studies
    Subject(s):
    16th century, 17th century, Early Modern, Renaissance, Renaissance drama
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    ben jonson, early modern England, masque, Renaissance drama
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6RJ8H
    Abstract:
    This paper argues that Epicene, Jonson's first public play after being made official court masque writer, is unusually optimistic about the possibilities of drama. The play explores the possibility of creating an authentic personality through performance, an idea that Jonson is often hostile towards. However, Jonson's flirtation with this pro-theater perspective was short lived. For complex reasons, Lady Arbella's complaint about the play led Jonson to once again grow cynical about the possibilities of the public stage. These vacillating perspectives, I argue, can be traced within the two different prologues, which offer two very different perspectives on playing, play going and the theater.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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