• Slaveholders and revolution: the Jamaican planter class, British imperial politics, and the ending of the slave trade, 1775–1807

    Author(s):
    Christer Petley (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    British History, History, University of Southampton Department of History
    Subject(s):
    18th century, Atlantic history, British empire, British history, Caribbean, History of slavery
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    18th Century, british empire, British history, Caribbean
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M68523
    Abstract:
    This article re-examines the declining influence of Jamaican sugar planters within the British Empire during the period between the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775 and Parliament’s decision to abolish the slave trade in 1807. Much of the existing scholarship emphasises the consequences of the American Revolutionary War and rise of abolitionism during the 1780s as pivotal to the fall of the planters. This article argues that those challenges did not determine the fate of the Jamaican planters. Rather, it was the radicalisation of the French and Haitian Revolutions, and the extended period of war that began in 1793, that led to their eventual defeat over the question of the slave trade.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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