• Knowing adoption and adopting knowledge

    Author(s):
    Ilana Gershon (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    Anthropology
    Subject(s):
    Sociology of the family
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    knowledge dissemination, kinship, adoption
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M63Z47
    Abstract:
    In the 1960s, the descent versus alliance debate dominated kinship studies-anthropologists wanted to determine what relationship offered the best analytic lens for understanding how social groups were formed. Those who favored descent felt that the most relevant question to ask was how groups constituted and reconstituted themselves across generations. From the perspective of descent theorists, existential facts—death and generational shifts—ensured that all social groups had to resolve the problem of maintaining themselves as continuous units. Alliance theorists took issue with this emphasis, believing that constructing group boundaries was an equally important task and one that required a focus on marriage as the beginning point for analysis. This debate was more than an argument about which type of relationship was more important. Those involved were questioning how best to understand the ways groups were constituted through kinship. In this review article, I ask a "what if question: What would have happened in kinship studies if kinship theorists had taken a third relationship—adoption—as a starting point? Had anthropologists followed Jack Goody's (1969) initiative in focusing on adoption, would this have led to a new perspective on relatedness?
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book review    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name:pdf gershon.knowing.adoption.pdf
     Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 151