• “Toward a Life Cycle Analysis of the Russian Revolution,” Kritika 18, 4 (Fall 2017): 741-83.

    Author(s):
    Michael David-Fox (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Subject(s):
    20th century, Modern Mexican history, Russian history, Russian studies, Transnational history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    comparative revolutions, history and social science, transnational and comparative history
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6322H
    Abstract:
    This article argues that the framework of the revolutionary life cycle can become a richly interpretive lens for Russian/Soviet historians of the entire late imperial and Soviet periods. The first section critically reviews the history of the approach and its recent revival in the field of comparative revolutions, focusing on the frequently flawed treatment of the Russian Revolution. The second part interprets the historiography of revolutionary Russia through the first half of the centennial in 2017, highlighting how the field has steadily but as yet still partially expanded its vision of the multiple dimensions of the revolutionary upheaval. A life cycle analysis would organically fit this expanding brief yet push it further. The final section explains how a vision of revolution that takes on board the concept of “life cycle” can illuminate the comparison and the interactions between one revealing yet neglected pair of revolutions in Russia and Mexico that occurred in the same extended historical moment.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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