• Women, Men, and the Legal Languages of Mining in the Colonial Andes

    Author(s):
    Allison Margaret Bigelow (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Colonial Latin American literature and culture, Gender studies, History of science, Indigenous peoples, Law
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M67N5R
    Abstract:
    Histories of colonial Latin American mining have cemented the image of a scientifically backward society whose pursuit of easy wealth sacrificed the lives of indigenous and African miners in places like Potosí. By examining a mid seventeenth-century mine dispute between an Andean woman and a Spanish man, this article suggests how legal archives can reveal indigenous women’s contributions to the history of colonial silver. It also provides an appendix with one hundred cases of indigenous, creole, and Spanish women miners, refiners, and managers in Alto Perú, 1559–1801, suggesting how women of different socioeconomic and technical backgrounds participated in the silver industry.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-ShareAlike

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