• Melancholy Projection

    Author(s):
    Matthew Noble-Olson (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    Film Studies
    Subject(s):
    21st century, Arts, Cinema
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6NR3R
    Abstract:
    The projected image has become increasingly prominent in the art gallery over the past quarter century.2 In the accompanying catalog to an illustrative 1997 exhibition, Projections: Les transports de l'image, Dominique Païni argued that this prominence of projection heralded its crisis, resulting from the displacement of film and photography by video and digital means. The 2010 installation American Falls by Phil Solomon both existed in and figured the crisis that Païni described. American Falls highlighted its filmic legacy through its images' appearance as distressed celluloid, produced by multiple stages of digital and chemical manipulation of carefully curated found footage, while multiplying its own projection; it figured the filmic medium in its digitally mediated images and was projected digitally onto six screens. American Falls presented an elegy for the filmic medium by retaining specific material characteristics of film as its content and model. Through an analysis of Solomon's postfilmic installation, I will theorize a practice of melancholy projection in which melancholia is an instance of failed or negative projection and projection exists as a juncture where nonidentity is cultivated in both cinema and psychoanalysis.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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