• Uneasy social and psychological landscapes in the cinemas of Chile and New Zealand

    Author(s):
    Walescka Pino-Ojeda (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    Film Studies
    Subject(s):
    Film and society
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6Z79N
    Abstract:
    Distinct modes of social and psychological angst are noted in a significant number of films from Chile and New Zealand, becoming most evident in the way family relations are portrayed, and in various modes through which the protagonists relate to their natural and social environment. This article focuses on the films In My Father’s Den (Brad McGann, New Zealand, 2004) and B-Happy (Gonzalo Justiniano, Chile, 2003). The narrative of both these films centres on lower-middle-class adolescent girls who reside in semi-rural areas, living in a state of unease due to the difficulties they confront in finding social and familial protection, which drives them to yearn and search for alternative geographical, cultural and affective landscapes. This comparative examination suggests that the crisis of identity displacement observed in New Zealand society engenders more tragic results than those gestated by the ‘concrete’ socio-economic exclusion found in Chile, indicating perhaps that sociopsychological anxieties require more complex and intricate strategies of recognition and eradication than those created by structural forms of social abuse.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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