• The Implications of Transnationalism

    Author(s):
    Michael David-Fox (see profile)
    Date:
    2011
    Subject(s):
    Historiography, Theory, Transnational history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Russian and Soviet Studies
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6078K
    Abstract:
    first para: When Kritika published a special issue in 2001 on the state of the field ten years after the end of communism, it was logical to include a reassessment of the October Revolution and two pieces on the rapidly developing investigation of the Stalin period. Transnational history went unmentioned, along with international and comparative approaches, for they did not yet appear crucial to the state of the field. If “culture” was “everywhere” in the Russian history of the 1990s, talk of the transnational became ubiquitous in the 2000s. In retrospect, however, the first post-Soviet decade laid the groundwork for the proliferation of cross-border and cross-cultural approaches by furthering a closely related phenomenon: intensive investigation of comparative dimensions to Russian and Soviet history.
    Notes:
    for special issue on “Twenty Years After: The State of the Field.”
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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