• “The People’s War: Ordinary People and Regime Strategies in a World of Extremes,” Slavic Review 75, 3 (Fall 2016): 551-559.

    Author(s):
    Michael David-Fox (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    German history, Russian studies, Soviet Union
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    World War II, National Socialism, Stalinism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6NZ12
    Abstract:
    First para: The German invasion of the USSR on June 22, 1941 brought with it the most extreme conditions of the short twentieth century. Suddenly, the existence of the Soviet state was no longer assured. What the regime did in response tells us much about Stalinism and the Soviet order. In an enormous swathe of territory from the western and southern borderlands of the USSR to the ethnic Russian heartland, the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and Operation Barbarossa triggered successive regime changes and reversals with which everyone had to reckon. States and armies were hardly the only critically important actors, moreover, as the war unleashed local confl icts and nationalist movements. In sum, aft er years of extreme statism and isolation, millions of Soviet citizens suddenly faced fateful decisions about what to do and how to act.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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