• Henry V, Anachronism, and the History of International Law

    Author(s):
    Christopher Warren (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    CLCS Renaissance and Early Modern, LLC 17th-Century English, TC Law and the Humanities
    Subject(s):
    16th century, 17th century, Law, Shakespeare, War literature
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    anachronism, historiography, international law, Shakespeare, presentism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6819C
    Abstract:
    Historians, literary scholars, and international lawyers interested in the early modern period have all grappled with the problem of anachronism, yet mostly independently of one another. This essay uses the question of war crime in Shakespeare’s Henry V to argue that early modernists interested in international law need not reject synchronic historicism for explicitly anachronistic or presentist approaches. Proposing as a new context for Shakespeare’s play a little-known humanist disputation by the civil lawyer Alberico Gentili, De amis Romanis (1599), it illuminates a juridical approach to the international past cultivated in the early modern period alongside the rise of international law—an approach closely linked with literary epistemologies.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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