• Fluid

    Author(s):
    James Smith (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    Environmental Humanities, Medieval Studies, Philosophy
    Subject(s):
    11th to 14th century, Ecocriticism, Environmental humanities
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6R19Q
    Abstract:
    Gathering into lively conversation scholars in medieval, early modern and object studies, Inhuman Nature explores the activity of the things, forces, and relations that enable, sustain and operate indifferently to us. Enamored by fictions of environmental sovereignty, we too often imagine “human” to be a solitary category of being. This collection of essays maps the heterogeneous and asymmetrical ecologies within which we are enmeshed, a material world that makes the human possible but also offers difficulties and resistance. Among the topics explored are the futurity that inheres in storms and wrecks, wood that resists its burning or offers art and dwelling, hymns that implant themselves like viruses, the ontology of everyday objects, the seep and flow of substance, the resistant nature of matter, the dependence of community upon making things public, and the interstices at which nature and culture become inseparable. Tinker as you will. TABLE OF CONTENTS // Jeffrey Jerome Cohen — Introduction: Ecostitial / Steve Mentz — Shipwreck / Anne Harris — Hewn / Alan Montroso — Human / Valerie Allen — Matter / Lowell Duckert — Recreation / Alfred Kentigern Siewers — Trees / James Smith — Fluid / Ian Bogost — Inhuman
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 month ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

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