• Peripheral people and places: an archaeologyof isolation

    Author(s):
    Emma Dwyer (see profile)
    Date:
    2009
    Group(s):
    Archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Archaeology
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Historical Archaeology
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6947Z
    Abstract:
    This chapter explores the creation of a narrative of ‘isolation’ between the late eighteenth and early twentieth centuries, focusing on the presentation of rural communities in Scotland, Wales and Ireland as passive and isolated from the cut and thrust of the metropolis. This narrative trope can be found in examples of travel writing and ethnography dating from the period 1750–1950, but is also apparent in more recent archaeological texts. Narratives of isolation can be fluid and can be manipulated. The ‘stories’ told in travel literature change over time, depending on the identities and motives of the groups involved; indeed, the value of travel accounts lies not so much in the ethnographic documentation of their subjects as in what they tell us about the motives of the people writing them.
    Notes:
    Peripheral people and places: an archaeology of isolation in N Brannon & A Horning (eds.) 2009, 'Ireland and Britain in the Atlantic World', Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group (Wordwell Books)
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

    Downloads

    Item Name: pdf ipmag2-chap6.pdf
      Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 0