• Airs, Waters, Metals, Earth: People and Environment in Archaic and Classical Greek Thought

    Author(s):
    Rebecca Kennedy (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    Ancient Greece & Rome
    Subject(s):
    Ancient Greek history, Classical studies, Environmental history, Ethnohistory, Intellectual history
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6S76Z
    Abstract:
    This chapter provides a series of case studies that explore different ways Archaic and Classical Greeks conceptualized human diversity (modern race and/or ethnicity) in relation to environment, in particular, the land. It explores three inter-related approaches the Greeks took towards understanding this relationship: myths of metals, autochthony, and environmental determinism. I argue that these approaches to the relationship binding human and land attempt to rationalize human difference in a way that privileges indigenous status as well as hereditary superiority. This rationalization might be considered a type of “proto-social Darwinism,” a organization of human diversity that ranks peoples on a scale from superior to inferior based on a normative standard and/or “purity.” This scale derives either from environmental metaphors or in direct relationship to the environment itself.
    Notes:
    First proof--numerous typographical errors.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter
    Author/Editor:
    Rebecca Futo Kennedy and Molly Jones-Lewis
    Book Title:
    Routledge Handbook to Identity and the Environment
    Chapter:
    1
    Start Page:
    9
    End Page:
    28
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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