• Publics and Audiences in Ancient Greece

    Author(s):
    David Roselli (see profile)
    Date:
    2013
    Subject(s):
    Ancient Greek history, Greek theatre, Performance and politics
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Ancient Athenian Politics, Ancient theatre, audience, Greek drama
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M66683
    Abstract:
    An overview of the historical constitution of theater audiences in Classical Athens and the implications of this assessment. I first sketch out the dominant ways in which modern scholars have defined ancient audiences. I argue that attention to (male) citizenship or Greek identity has effaced the presence and role of other groups in the audience. In the second section I discuss the evidence for audiences in ancient Athens. Available space for spectators and the various barriers to these spaces shaped the diverse constitution of audiences; from the Classical to early Hellenistic period (ca. 480–300 BC), theaters did not merely expand and proliferate but redefined the make-up of audiences. The third section explores the discourse of audiences in ancient sources. As I briefly elaborate in the conclusion, this chapter aims to unsettle and provincialize the idea of citizen audiences.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter
    Author/Editor:
    R. Butsch and S. Livingstone (eds)
    Book Title:
    Meanings of Audiences: Comparative Discourses
    Start Page:
    20
    End Page:
    36
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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