• Beyond Accommodation: Disability, Feminist Philosophy, and the Design of Everyday Academic Life

    Author(s):
    Aimi Hamraie (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    Critical Disability Studies
    Subject(s):
    Academe, Academic labor, Disability studies, Feminist theory
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    feminist philosophy
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M66H4P
    Abstract:
    Disability has become a hot topic for feminist philosophy in recent years. Special issues of Hypatia and Disability Studies Quarterly, multiple conference keynote addresses, and a growing cadre of scholars are exploring the intersections of feminist and critical disability thought. As a disabled feminist scholar, I perceive these trends as a signal that the field of feminist philosophy is taking up disability concepts and theories in valuable ways. There is certainly much that feminist philosophers can learn from disabled scholars and critical disability scholarship and activism. Unlike dominant medical models of disability, which treat disabled minds and bodies as objects of knowledge for science and biomedicine, critical disability theories foreground disabled peoples’ knowledge and lived experiences. Often in conversation with feminist theories, they define disability as a valuable form of human variation, cultural diversity, situated knowledge, and a basis for relational ethics that should be preserved, and even desired (Mitchell and Snyder 2006; Kafer 2013; Garland-Thomson 2011).
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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