• Of Learned Ignorance: Idea of A Treatise in Philosophy

    Author(s):
    M. Munro (see profile)
    Date:
    2013
    Group(s):
    Philosophy
    Subject(s):
    Philosophy
    Item Type:
    Book
    Tag(s):
    history of philosophy, literature and philosophy, Metaphilosophy, philosophy
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6XH5K
    Abstract:
    What is a problem? What’s asked in that question, and how does one even begin to take its measure? How else could one begin, except as one does with any other problem—by way of its impulsion. Of Learned Ignorance is about philosophy because philosophy is about problems: philosophy, in a word, is where problems become a problem. Of Learned Ignorance: Idea of a Treatise in Philosophy is a dead letter perhaps above all because it is problematic (in the Kantian sense): It is a (sober) attempt at exemplifying what it talks about—and what eludes it: A series of footnotes effects something like the integration of a differential, the reciprocal determination that the sources enter into in relation to one another in order to produce a paper, essay, or (inexistent) (chap)book. So Of Learned Ignorance, in facing down a problem, makes a wager; it courts failure; it puts it all on the line. All, yes, for love—a kind of love… (of wisdom?)
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

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