• Traveling Chaucer: Comparative Translation and Cosmopolitan Humanism

    Author(s):
    Candace Barrington (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    CLCS Medieval, LLC Chaucer, LLC Middle English, TC Translation Studies, TM Literary Criticism
    Subject(s):
    Adaptation, Translation studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6ZH5W
    Abstract:
    Through the comparative study of non-Anglophone translations of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, we can achieve the progressive goals of Emily Apter’s “translational transnationalism” and Edward Said’s “cosmopolitan humanism.” Both translation and humanism were intrinsic to Chaucer’s initial composition of the Tales, and in turn, both shaped Chaucer’s later reception, often in ways that did a disservice to his reputation and his verse. In this essay, Candace Barrington argues that comparative translation provides a means whereby new modes of translation, like Apter’s, can promote a different version of humanism, like Said’s; she demonstrates this process in a brief philological study of Nazmi A˘gıl’s Turkish translation of The Squire’s Tale. While we can see the infusion of Turkish values and perspectives in the new text, we can also see that the Turkish reveals new insights into Chaucer’s subtle and nuanced use of language.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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