• The incoherence of denying my death

    Author(s):
    Lajos Brons (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Subject(s):
    Death, Philosophy
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Denial of Death, Afterlife, Life after Death
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6KT12
    Abstract:
    The most common way of dealing with the fear of death is denying death. Such denial can take two and only two forms: strategy 1 denies the finality of death; strategy 2 denies the reality of the dying subject. Most religions opt for strategy 1, but Buddhism seems to be an example of the 2nd. All variants of strategy 1 fail, however, and a closer look at the main Buddhist argument reveals that Buddhism in fact does not follow strategy 2. Moreover, there is no other theory that does, and neither can there be. This means that there is no tenable theory that denies death. There may be no universally psychologically acceptable alternative, however, which would mean that if denying death is incoherent, this is an unavoidable incoherence.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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