• "At Last Everyone Had Something to Talk About": Gloria's War in Fitzgerald's The Beautiful and Damned

    Author(s):
    Ross Tangedal (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    LLC 20th- and 21st-Century American, LLC Late-19th- and Early-20th-Century American
    Subject(s):
    American literature, War literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    trauma, midwest
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6NQ3D
    Abstract:
    Noticeably absent from much of the criticism on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Beautiful and Damned is an examination of Gloria Patch and her role in Fitzgerald’s treatment of war. Fitzgerald offers a fascinating and timely portrait of a young wife dealing with war and remembrance from multiple perspectives, spanning from her Midwestern roots to her ascendancy within the nouveau riche of New York. Gloria Patch represents a complex identity indicative of World War I, since war at this scale had never occurred before, and those at home were greatly scarred as a result of the madness. Fitzgerald uses Gloria as a conduit for domestic fears, anxieties, and exasperations, all results of the war that changed the world forever.
    Notes:
    Published as part of a special issue on "World War I and the Midwest."
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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