• Designed to Amuse: Hemingway's The Torrents of Spring and Intertextual Comedy

    Author(s):
    Ross Tangedal (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    LLC 20th- and 21st-Century American, TM Book History, Print Cultures, Lexicography
    Subject(s):
    American literature, Bibliography, Publishing
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Authorship, print culture
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M65Q32
    Abstract:
    Easily the least-mentioned (and read) of Ernest Hemingway’s works (proven by its lack of critical attention), The Torrents of Spring merits rereading for its intertextual play. Hemingway's use of embedded author’s notes throughout the text guides readers to a more fully aware young writer who offers critiques of composition, authorship, printing and the publishing industry as components of his satirical take on Sherwood Anderson. His use of author’s notes points to a writer willing to experiment with intertextual elements in order to critique multiple publishing functions along with his earliest champions. Recognizing the former strengthens our reading of early Hemingway as he sought to evolve into the writer he would eventually become.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal Article
    Journal:
    MidAmerica
    Volume:
    41
    Start Page:
    11
    End Page:
    22
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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