• The earliest socketed axes in southeastern Europe. Tracking the spread of a Bronze Age technological innovation

    Author(s):
    Oliver Dietrich (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    Archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Archaeology, Prehistoric archaeology
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Bronze Age, metalwork, socketed axes, Carpathian Basin
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6CH47
    Abstract:
    Although their early evolution is largely obscure, socketed axes are among the most numerous artefacts of the Southeastern European Late Bronze Age. They seem to appear all at once in a horizon of hoards conventionally parallelized with the Central European Bz D phase. Some researchers have tried to explain this sudden occurrence as the result of a local development which began with Early Bronze Age socketed chisels. Others seek their origin in the Seima-Turbino metalwork horizon (in which socketed axes are already attested to in the first quarter of the 2nd millennium BC). Starting from there, a complex pattern of transmission through different cultural milieus is suggested until their arrival in the Carpathian Basin around 1300 BC. The present contribution sets out to clarify some aspects of the invention and spread of this Bronze Age innovation.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter
    Author/Editor:
    Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde
    Book Title:
    Forging Identities. The Mobility of Culture in Bronze Age Europe: Volume 2.
    Start Page:
    39
    End Page:
    46
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

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