• ‘The Raven and the Rose’: Tradition and Death/Doom Metal Music

    Author(s):
    M.Selim Yavuz (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Group(s):
    Music and Sound
    Subject(s):
    Ethnomusicology, Metal Music Studies, Musicology, Popular Music Studies
    Item Type:
    Conference paper
    Conf. Title:
    British Forum for Ethnomusicology 2017
    Conf. Org.:
    University of Sheffield
    Conf. Loc.:
    Sheffield, United Kingdom
    Conf. Date:
    20-23 April 2017
    Tag(s):
    doom metal, extreme metal, metal music studies, sociology of music
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M66D51
    Abstract:
    Death/doom metal music, a style of extreme metal, emerged around the beginning of 1990s with a genius loci in West Yorkshire. While this style dispersed around the globe during this decade and later decades, the pioneers of this style -namely Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride, and Anathema- quickly moved on from the style which they are credited to originate. This rapid stylistic shift made the fans comprehend the three bands in ways which the tradition in death/doom is reflected. For example, even though, from a musicological standpoint, My Dying Bride have gone through significant changes in their style over their career, ethnographic research shows that the majority of fans of this music world considers My 88 Dying Bride to be the most traditional of the three, while equating Anathema with change. This results in many fans dismissing Anathema’s music with just ‘change’ without articulation. When larger metal music culture’s emphasis on tradition is considered, this attitude of valuing tradition can be considered to be an inherited tradition in itself. Furthermore, ethnography of this music world illustrate that one of the main reasons this world became a separate culture from a larger metal or even extreme metal culture arises from the style’s perceived difference from the other metal musics. The dichotomy of craving difference and valuing tradition at the same time dawns as one of the conventional behaviours in this music world. As implied from the name of the style, a style of contrasts is reflected in contrasting behaviour. The proposed paper discusses this contrast using ethnographic data of the fan culture alongside musicological analyses of the bands’ music and articulates the implications of tradition in death/doom metal music.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    8 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

    Downloads

    Item Name: pdf mselimyavuz-theravenandtherose.pdf
      Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 37