• Review of Jason von Ehrenkrook, Sculpting Idolatry in Flavian Rome: (An)Iconic Rhetoric in the Writings of Flavius Josephus (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2011)

    Author(s):
    Patrick McCullough (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    Ancient Jew Review
    Subject(s):
    Archaeology, Early Judaism, Greco-Roman religion, Jewish history, Roman art
    Item Type:
    Book review
    Tag(s):
    Iconoclasm, identity, Jewish Revolt, Josephus, Roman Empire
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6GW9V
    Abstract:
    Historians tend to turn data into stories. For those of us who study the ancient data typically categorized as early Judaism and early Christianity, few stories captivate as much as Jewish particularism and the tale of the “turncoat” general Josephus. The story of Jewish particularism during the first century often assumes an inevitable culture clash. The Jews are different; Rome quashes difference. Josephus somehow negotiated that difference and jumped on board the victor’s train. The Jewish understanding of figurative images stands out as a key piece in this story. Rome loves images and statues; in the first century, Jews could not tolerate images—though, their aversion abates somewhat after 70 CE. Josephus plays into this narrative through his writings. In an admirable first book, Jason von Ehrenkrook seeks to complicate this story by taking a closer look at the data. . . .
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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