• Inform to Perform: Using Domain Analysis to Explore Amateur Athlete Information Resources and Behaviour

    Author(s):
    Alison Pope (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    CityLIS, Library & Information Science
    Subject(s):
    Library and information science, Sociology of sport
    Item Type:
    Dissertation
    Institution:
    City, University of London
    Tag(s):
    Domain Analysis, Information behaviour, Sport, Sport Analytics, Sport Informatics
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M67S9N
    Abstract:
    Sporting information has been relatively unexamined in library and information science (LIS) literature with most research concentrating on collection management or archival functions. User studies in LIS have covered some aspects of outdoor recreation and hobbies, but only one study has been found explicitly researching amateur athletes. This project builds contributes a definition of sport as an information domain and an exploratory user study of amateur athletes. The research takes a socio-cognitive approach and uses domain analysis linked to serious leisure, information communication chain and information behaviour theories to provide the research context. These foundational theories are used to define sport as an information domain more formally, noting both degrees of specialisation within it and intersections with related disciplines. Four domain analysis approaches are then used to illustrate the potential of the approach for researching different dimensions within the domain. Three of these approaches involve desk research into different aspects of amateur sport information. By discussing the role of documents, computer science and discourses in sport these approaches show that sport is a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary domain with many topics of interest for the information researcher and practitioner. The fourth approach is a user study of athlete information behaviour that collected data on information sources, tasks and attitudes via an online questionnaire.
    Notes:
    This dissertation was submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for the degree MSc in Information Science. It was supervised by Dr Lyn Robinson.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    Attribution
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