• THE DISABLED HERO: BEING AND ETHICS IN PETER JACKSON’S THE LORD OF THE RINGS

    Author(s):
    Todd Comer (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Adaptation, Disability, Disability studies, Film and society, Speculative fiction
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Peter Jackson, Disability, Wound
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6962R
    Abstract:
    My interest is not merely to trace the appearance of the wound motif throughout Jackson’s trilogy, but also to make an argument about Frodo as a particular kind of disabled hero whose essence is to remain open to others, by contrast to Sauron. My central concern is disability, in particular the question of being, or how the disabled body of Frodo signals a more ethical way of being. More specifically, I am interested in Jackson’s films as a way of thinking through how disability affects the interpretive and narratival nets that we use to orient ourselves in the world and in order to begin to formulate an ethics grounded in disability. . . . Sauron without his wound amounts to the illusory self-sufficient individual. Frodo and his wound, as I will describe in detail, represents another way of being, a way of living in the world that recognizes dependence (as metaphorically embodied in and through the wound), on others and the world.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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