• "Satire" in Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy, ed. by Marco Sgarbi (Berlin: Springer)

    Author(s):
    Paola Ugolini (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Italian literature, Italian studies, Renaissance philosophy
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M64P6J
    Abstract:
    Satire, in both prose and verse, was a relevant form of expression in the Renaissance. The development of Renaissance satire was influenced by the new vogue for the classics that brought back to fame satirists such as Horace and Juvenal. During the Renaissance satiric works were written in neo-Latin and in the vernaculars, and both in prose and in verse. Prose satire took the form of dialogues, letters, or mock encomia. Verse satire took the form of the satiric capitolo in rhyme, and such poetic forms began to be published in collections of works by different authors. During the same period, satire was also systematized from the theoretical point of view in various treatises on the nature of the genre. In spite of its popularity, nonetheless, satire experienced a drastic downfall at the end of the sixteenth century.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter
    Publisher:
    Springer
    Book Title:
    Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

    Downloads

    Item Name: docx satire-final.docx
      Download
    Activity: Downloads: 0