• "Mad Scientists, Narrative, and Social Power: A Collaborative Learning Activity"

    Author(s):
    Sarah Berry, Anthony Cerulli (see profile)
    Date:
    2013
    Group(s):
    Medical Humanities
    Subject(s):
    Literature and medicine, Literature and science
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    19th cent. american literature, gender studies, institutional power, nathaniel hawthorne, pedagogy
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M67W55
    Abstract:
    Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short stories “The Birthmark” (1843) and “Rappaccini’s Daughter” (1844) encourage critical thinking about science and scientific research as forms of social power. In this collaborative activity, students work in small groups to discuss the ways in which these stories address questions of human experimentation, gender, manipulation of bodies, and the role of narrative in mediating perceptions about bodies. Students collectively adduce textual evidence from the stories to construct claims and present a mini-argument to the class, thereby strengthening their skills in communication and cooperative interpretation of ethical dilemmas. This exercise is adaptable to shorter and longer periods of instruction, and it is ideal for instructors who collaborate across areas of expertise.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal Article
    Publisher:
    Springer
    Journal:
    Journal of Medical Humanities
    Volume:
    34
    Issue:
    4
    Start Page:
    451
    End Page:
    454
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 weeks ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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