• Jewish Questions in Robert Wilson’s The Three Ladies of London

    Author(s):
    Brett Greatley-Hirsch (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Drama, Early modern studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Jews, Renaissance drama, The Three Ladies of London, Theatre history
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6TW5F
    Abstract:
    In the history of portraying Jews on the early modern stage, critics frequently cite Robert Wilson’s The Three Ladies of London as an anomaly. The play’s first modern editor, H.S.D. Mithal, went so far as to describe Gerontus as ‘a character sui generis’, quite unlike Marlowe’s porridge-poisoning Machiavel, Shakespeare’s knife-whetting usurer, and the devilish doctor in Selimus. This essay explores the questions raised by Wilson’s portrayal of Gerontus, paying particular attention to their critical and theatrical implications. What was understood by the term ‘Jew’ and how might Elizabethan audiences have recognized Gerontus as a Jew? Is the play really an anomaly of early modern theatre history?
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    9 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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