• Epiphanius of Salamis and the Antiquarian’s Bible

    Author(s):
    Andrew Jacobs (see profile)
    Date:
    2013
    Group(s):
    Late Antiquity, Religious Studies
    Subject(s):
    Ancient history, Biblical studies, History of religions
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Early Christianity, Epiphanius, late antique literature, Late antiquity
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6C610
    Abstract:
    Compared to more philosophical biblical interpreters such as Origen, Epiphanius of Salamis often appears to modern scholars as plodding, literalist, reactionary, meandering, and unsophisticated. In this article I argue that Epiphanius’s eclectic and seemingly disorganized treatment of the Bible actually draws on a common, imperial style of antiquarianism. Through an examination of four major treatises of Epiphanius—his Panarion and Ancoratus, as well as his lesser-studied biblical treatises, On Weights and Measures and On Gems—I trace this antiquarian style and suggest that perhaps Epiphanius’s antiquarian Bible might have resonated more broadly than the high-flown intellectual Bible of thinkers like Origen.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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