• Uptake and genre: The Canadian reception of suffrage militancy

    Author(s):
    Katja Thieme (see profile)
    Date:
    2006
    Group(s):
    Feminist Humanities, History
    Subject(s):
    Canadian history, Political literature, Rhetoric
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    genre theory, speech act theory, suffrage, uptake, Womens History Month
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6MW5K
    Abstract:
    From 1909 onward, the Canadian suffrage debate was heavily influenced by reports on suffrage militancy from Great Britain and the United States. Militancy played an influential role in Canadian suffrage history not through its practice–there was no Canadian militant campaign–but through an ongoing discussion of its meaning. Using Anne Freadman's notions of genre and uptake, this paper analyzes the discursive uptake of suffrage militancy—from news reports on front pages, to commentary on women's pages, to reviews of Emmeline Pankhurst's Canadian speaking engagements. The Canadian debate about militancy is a fertile site for drawing out the roles of genre and uptake in the political positioning of both suffragists and suffrage sceptics. Talk about militancy serves as a way to regulate the uptake of this particular genre of political action, whereby both sides tended to share the optimistic view that Canadian suffragists where not yet in need of militancy.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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