• The Ground Was Always in Play

    Author(s):
    Madiha Tahir (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Ethics, War literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    drone, embodiment, space and place, testimony, War
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6190J
    Abstract:
    Without the people from Pakistan’s Tribal Areas to narrate the visual evidence, one wouldn’t necessarily know what one was looking at in the photos or videos of the aftermath of drone attacks. To tell their stories, they had moved through a territory pockmarked by bombs and checkpoints and drones and troops and fighters, but to those sitting in Islamabad or New York or London, these things signified that the territory was “wild” and its people therefore probably faithless. The doubt was unequally distributed, and the judgment was always made against the backdrop of a relentless distrust. A bitter pill: they endured the containment zone, but their experiences of it rendered the testimonies of their experiences unstable. As they were made mute, the forensic experts were called in to make objects speak.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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