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MemberSarah Magnatta

Sarah received her PhD in Art History from The Ohio State University, specializing in Tibetan and South Asian art.  Her upcoming article is titled “Common Ground: Place and Identity in Contemporary Tibetan Art,” in a special issue of the Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies.  She is currently an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver, where she has taught since 2010.  Her courses include Asian art history, Tibetan art, Sacred Spaces, Politics in Art, and Buddhism in Art. She also teaches a travel course each summer that brings students to the galleries of New York City.  Titled “Tibet on Display,” the students learn how institutional motivations vary between places like the Met, the Natural History Museum, the Tibet House, and the Rubin Museum of Art. Sarah spent three years as the Interpretive Specialist of Asian Art at the Denver Art Museum, where she worked on exhibitions such as Ganesha: The Playful Protector and Linking Asia, for which she wrote the catalog essay “The Transmission of Buddhist Imagery throughout Asia.”  Sarah is now working on various exhibitions throughout Denver, including curating an exhibition with contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon at McNichols Civic Center and an exhibition with contemporary Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol at the Emmanuel Art Gallery on Auraria campus.

MemberKavita Daiya

Kavita Daiya is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and The Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University. In AY 2015-2016, she held the NEH endowed Chair in the Humanities at Albright College, focusing on Global Migration and Asia. She was Mellon Regional Faculty Fellow at the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania (2014-2015). She serves as Associate Editor of the MLA-Allied Association journal “South Asian Review.” She has also been a Research Fellow at the Globalization Project at the University of Chicago.Daiya’s research and teaching expertise spans postcolonial literature and cinema, gender studies, globalization, peace and conflict studies, and ethnic American studies. Her current book focuses on ethnic migrations, citizenship, and gender in South Asia and the United States. She has written numerous articles on the 1947 Partition, South Asian literature and culture, South African Literature, gender studies, and transnational cinema, and her first book was published in the US and India: Violent Belongings: Partition, Gender and National Culture in Colonial India (Philadelphia: Temple UP, [2008] 2011; New Delhi: Yoda Press, 2013).

Daiya directs a Digital Humanities Histories of Violence and Migration initiative http://www.1947Partition.org. She has co-edited a special issue “Imagining South Asia” of the “South Asian Review,” and has been invited to present her work at the US State Department, University of Chicago, Amherst College, University of Maryland, University of Pennsylvania, Brandeis University, Georgetown University, and the University of Michigan, among others. Her research has been generously supported by fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, and George Washington University’s Global Women’s Institute and Sigur Center for Asian Studies. She serves as a member of the Board of Directors of The 1947 Partition Archive (www.1947PartitionArchive.org). In 2013, she co-founded the Philadelphia South Asian American Association.

MemberIlyse Morgenstein Fuerst

I am Ilyse R. Morgenstein Fuerst and, yes, that whole bit after the R. is my surname. I’m an assistant professor of religion and the current director of Middle East studies at the University of Vermont. I’m also the co-chair of the Study of Islam Unit at the American Academy of Religion, the editor of the Islam section for Religion Compass, and on various editorial and advisory boards for Islamic studies journals and projects. Generally speaking, my published work addresses South Asian Islam, theories and history of religion, and the racialization of Islam. My first book, Indian Muslim Minorities and the 1857 Rebellion, was published by I.B. Tauris in 2017. I’m working on other projects, mostly around boundaries of the study of Islam, memorialization of Islamic history in South Asia, and histories of Islamophobia and the racialization of Muslims.

MemberCamille Cole

…ttoman-British Relations in Iraq, 1861-1918,” Middle Eastern Studies (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00263206.2018.1462164)

“Precarious Empires: A Social and Environmental History of Steam Navigation on the Tigris,” Journal of Social History 50 (2016): 74-101.

“From Forest to Delta: Recent Themes in South Asian Environmental History,” South Asian History and Culture 7 (2016): 208-19….

I am a PhD candidate in History at Yale University, working on the histories of environment, law, and capitalism in late Ottoman Iraq. My dissertation, “Empire on Edge: Land, Law, and Capital in Gilded Age Basra, 1884-1914,” uses microhistory to explore how individual capitalists shaped the emergence of capitalism and modern state practice by manipulating novel state vocabularies and bureaucratic instruments.