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MemberEmily Friedman

…omen Novelists of the 1750s, edited by Susan Carlile. Bethlehem: Lehigh University Press, 2010.

Forthcoming:

“Am I A Romanticist? My Department Can’t Decide.” Keats-Shelley Journal, “200 Years, 50 Voices” special issue (2020)
“‘Is It Thursday Yet?” Narrative Time in Critical Role” in Roleplaying Games in the Digital Age: Essays on Transmedia Storytelling, Tabletop Role-Playing, and Fandom, Eds. Jennifer Grouling & Stephanie Hedge (Studies in Gaming Series, McFarland & Co.)
“Must Anonymous Be a Woman? Gender and Anonymity in the Archives” (Special Issue on “Women in Archives” for Tulsa Studies in Wo…

I’m a scholar and critic who wants to understand media experiences from audiences of the past, present, and future. This fascination has taken me to study the language of smell, the work of recovered women writers, never-published manuscript fiction, fanwork, and livestreamed tabletop roleplaying games. I believe that technological shifts of the past can illuminate our present, that book history and digital scholarship work beautifully together, that librarians and archivists are invaluable collaborators, and that hands-on experience of research is an important component of student learning. My most important work is as academic hype-woman for literary and academic work. My project to make manuscript fiction more discoverable through better metadata led me to become the director of 18thConnect.org, an aggregator of eighteenth-century primary and secondary resources. I spend a good chunk of my time helping newbie digital scholars think about how to organize and plan their projects.

MemberHamish Cameron

Hamish began his study of the ancient world in Christchurch, continued it in Los Angeles, road-tripped with it to Maine via the Midwest, and has now returned with it to Wellington. Thematically, he studies movement, borderlands, networks, geography and imperialism. Geographically, he explores the Eastern Mediterranean, Southwest Asia/the Near East and Rome. Chronologically, he investigates the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Philologically, he enjoys cultural allusions and tricola. No, tetracola… Wait, I’ll come in again… Hamish received his PhD in Classics from the University of Southern California in 2014 where he wrote a dissertation examining the representation of “Mesopotamia” as a borderland in Imperial Roman geographic writing of the first four centuries CE. His monograph on the subject has now been published: Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland (Brill 2019). He received his MA from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2006 with a thesis on the arrival of Roman power in Cilicia. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science and Technology (2011) from the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. He has participated in two survey seasons in Greece and in specialist conferences on digital geography, borderlands, networks, religion, and Cilicia. Hamish has taught classes in History and Classical Languages dealing with topics from the Bronze Age to the Information Age. He is interested in the applied methodologies of digital humanities, especially digital geography, the digital dissemination of academic information, and the pedagogy of tabletop games. He also designs boardgames and roleplaying games.

MemberMaximilian Stewart-Hawley Cronkite

I am in the final year of my Bachelor of Arts with honours at Carleton University. My major is in history and I have a minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies as well as Greek and Roman Studies. My main area of interest, as well as the subject of my undergraduate honours thesis, is Early Medieval Europe. More specifically, the social, political, and religious relationships during the 6th century in Frankish Gaul – mainly through the writings of Gregor of Tours. I am currently studying the language of Old Norse/Icelandic and the associated literature, particularly the writings of Snorri Sturluson. I particularly enjoy conversion history and the comparison of pre-Christian Scandinavia to western Christian culture.

MemberErik Malcolm Champion

UNESCO Chair of Cultural Heritage and Visualisation, and Professor at Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry, in the Humanities Faculty of Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. The purpose of the Chair is to promote an integrated system of research, training, information and documentation on virtual heritage sites and facilitate collaboration between high-level, internationally-recognized researchers and teaching staff of Curtin University and other institutions throughout the world.   My recent books are Critical Gaming: Interactive History and Virtual Heritage for Routledge’s Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities Series, Playing with the Past (Springer, 2011), editor of Game Mods: Design, Theory and Criticism (ETC Press, 2012) and co-editor of  Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities (Routledge, 2017).

MemberIan Kerr

 Greetings, my name is Ian Kerr and I am a history major with third year standing, and I am currently in the process of earning my BA Honors degree. I’ve always been extremely interested in Ancient history and ancient societies such as Ancient Greece, Rome and Ancient Egypt to name a few. However, one of my main passions ever since I was a little kid was my fascination with the middle Ages, particularly the culture and the imagery associated with the era Knights, Kings, Queens, Bishops and so forth, and as such I’ve always wanted to learn more about the era in general. I chose this course because it seems like one of the best opportunities I will ever get to learn about this culture and actually interact with pieces of mediaeval history first hand, as well as being able to analyze and discuss them, so I am very excited to be taking this course. Some random things about me are that I have a Siamese cat named Benkei (named after the Japanese warrior monk folk hero, who according to legend held a bridge against 20-40 enemy soldiers in one of the most memorable epic last stands in history. Another random thing is that I really enjoy video games, particularly any strategy or fantasy games, such as World of Warcraft and StarCraft 2 or the total war strategy game series. Overall, I am really looking forward to taking this course throughout the year, meeting all of you, and of course learning some really neat stuff about the middle ages.

MemberDennis Lloyd

I’ve worked at six different university presses: Illinois, Kentucky, Pittsburgh, Alabama, Florida, and Wisconsin. I began my career as an acquisitions assistant, then shifted to marketing and sales, before becoming director. Even if I had correctly answered “What is Amazon?” during my Jeopardy! appearance, I’d still have lost the game (I came in third).