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MemberParkorn Wangpaiboonkit

Parkorn’s research considers realism in opera and music drama as a means of inventing racial difference across the colonial modern. His work diagnoses the practice of dramatizing and musicalizing another/an Other’s ethnicity as an imperial tool for race-making in the colonial liminal, historicizing the discourse on race and opera away from contemporary identity politics. His current project focuses on Western art practices in nineteenth-century Siam, and examines how the selective emulation and criticism of Italian opera at the Siamese court served as a discursive site for negotiating ethnological imperialism. Parkorn’s broader interests in opera studies include the performance of race and racialization, operatic masculinities and queer opera culture, new and old technologies of operatic sound reproduction, and colonial histories of Western opera. His article “Excavating operatic masculinity” is forthcoming with Cambridge Opera Journal.

MemberBradley Irish

Bradley J. Irish studies the literature and culture of sixteenth-century England, with a particular focus on the history of emotion.  His first book — Emotion in the Tudor Court: Literature, History, and Early Modern Feeling — draws on literary analysis, archival research, and cross-disciplinary scholarship in the sciences and humanities to interrogate the socioliterary operation of emotion in the Tudor courtly sphere. His research interests include: Tudor political and cultural history; emotions in early modern culture; Henrician literature and culture; Renaissance poetry, especially Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, and Spenser; the Elizabethan courtier poets; Renaissance drama, including Shakespeare; the revenge tragedy tradition; the stoic tradition in Renaissance literature; early modern manuscript culture; paleography and archival research.  

MemberDaniel Davies

After studying in Edinburgh and Berlin, I entered the University of Pennsylvania’s graduate program in English, where I am currently completing my Ph.D. My research centers on war and literature in the late Middle Ages, focusing in particular on how the sprawling series of conflicts now known as the Hundred Years War (1337-1453) changed the way war was represented, theorized, and historicized. I also have related interests in classical reception, material texts, visual culture, and the methodologies of literary study.

MemberFabio Liberto

…espeare, Fuseli, and Problems of Visual Representation in Romantic Culture’, Textus 24, no. 1 (2011): 131–52, https://doi.org/10.1400/177151.
– Fabio Liberto, ‘The Politics of Language in P.B. Shelley’, La Questione Romantica 2, no. 1 (April 2010): 43–59.
– Fabio Liberto, ‘New Historicism’, in Manuale di letteratura e cultura inglese, ed. Lilla Maria Crisafulli and Keir Elam (Bologna: Bononia University Press, 2009), 500.
– Fabio Liberto, ‘Storia, storiografia e storie della letteratura’, in Manuale di letteratura e cultura inglese, ed. Lilla Maria Crisaf…

https://hcommons.org/members/fabio/

MemberKalle Westerling

Kalle Westerling is a Ph.D. Candidate in Theatre and Performance and a Futures Initiative Graduate Fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and Director of HASTAC Scholars, a vibrant student network within The Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC). Currently, he is completing his dissertation on the history and aesthetics of male-identified bodies in 20th-century burlesque and 21st-century boylesque, “The Roots and Routes of Boylesque: Queering Male Striptease and Burlesque in New York City from 1930s Golden Age Burlesque to the New York Boylesque Festival in the 2010s.” His monograph, La Dolce Vita (Normal 2006) treats the history of the Swedish drag company After Dark. He regularly delivers scholarly papers at the annual conferences for the American Society for Theatre Researchers (ASTR) and the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE). Recently, his performance-related theatre work has included an English translation and dramaturgy of August Strindberg’s The Pelican for the Voyage Theatre Company’s 2016 production in New York City. In 2017, he will also dramaturge Parts Unknown—their reading series of newly written drama. Kalle has taught courses at Villanova University, New York University, Baruch College, Hunter College, and Stockholm University, and has guest lectured at Yale University, The New School, Carleton University, and Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Arts. He regularly presents on the topics of queer and LGBT studies, the digital humanities, the public humanities, and on how to leverage digital technology for effective pedagogy. As part of his service to the academic profession, Kalle frequently blogs and employs social media to connect others and build communities. He has organized many conferences, including contributions to HASTAC’s annual international conferences in 2015 and 2016, and the After Marriage Conference in New York City. Kalle has also held board appointments with CLAGS: Center for LGBTQ Studies (Chair of Programming), the open-source publishing platform OpenCUNY, and the CUNY Doctoral Theatre Students’ Association.