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MemberFranklin Ridgway

American Literature, Marxism, American Studies, Travel Writing, Built Environment, American Culture, Nineteenth Century Studies, Sociotechnical Systems, Enviromental Humanities, Literary Geography, Nineteenth Century United States, Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Literary Regionalism, American Realism and Naturalism, American Realism, Media History, Lacanian theory, U.S. Intellectual History, Spectatorship, American Immigrant Narratives, Phenomenology of Space and Place, Science and technology studies, Environmental Humanities, and Twentieth Century Literature

MemberGenevieve Creedon

My research focuses on the ways in which narratives and discursive practices frame landscapes and shape human interactions with environments. I am interested in how individuals, institutions, and corporations use and participate in stories that foster affective connections to local, national, and international landscapes. As a comparative literature scholar working in the Environmental Humanities, with strong backgrounds in American Studies, Cultural Studies, and Animal Studies, I have focused my work on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, while drawing on transnational histories, currents, and influences. This has allowed me to integrate my interests in environmental studies and narrative studies with my training as a creative writer in developing an inter-disciplinary comparative framework for examining how narrative and rhetorical practices structure our experiences of nature.

MemberChristine Flanagan

Christine Flanagan is Professor of English at University of the Sciences and was the recipient of the 2017 Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching. Professor Flanagan is a faculty member in the University Honors Program, faculty advisor for The Elixir (the USciences’ literary journal), and coordinator of the Misher Festival of Fine Arts and Humanities. In addition to developing interdisciplinary environmental humanities classes, travel-based coursework in the humanities, and a Minor in Creative Writing, Professor Flanagan’s teaching and scholarship reflects her varied interests and activities: writing fiction, nonfiction, and drama; scholarship on the short stories of Flannery O’Connor; and research on experiential learning and creativity.

MemberAnnie Rehill

Areas of special interest: Francophone Canadian literature, Francophone Antillean literature, French literature, ecocriticism, humanities, history, intersections between cultures and languages, creative writing. PhD, Modern French Studies. Coureurs de bois and voyageurs, 17th–19th century Canadian backwoodsmen known for their independence of spirit and connections with Amerindians and the wilderness. Canadian Métis culture.

MemberPamela Herron

Pamela Herron’s primary research interests include China and Chinese culture and literature; Confucianism and Daoism; Chinese immigration; environmentalism and sustainability; and ecocriticism. She served three years on the MLA Committee for Contingent Labor in the Profession (2014-2017) and promoted more equitable treatment for non-tenured faculty on her own campus. She has developed and taught courses on “Chinese Culture and Humanities”, “Revolutionary Women of China” (Chinese literature by women of the 20th century), “Young Adult Literature” (with a focus on a multicultural approach, social justice, and sustainability), “Confucianism and Daoism”, and “Daoism and the Environment” which pioneered teaching environmental/nature literature at the University of Texas at El Paso. In recent years she has been exploring the Daodejing, along with other ancient Chinese texts, through a sustainable and ecocritical lens. “Daoism and the Environment” was developed with the Daodejing as a foundation text compared with selections of more contemporary environmental and nature writing. Currently she is working on adapting this “Daoism and the Environment” course to an online teaching format, along with her “Confucianism and Daoism” course. Her first book of nature poetry En L’Air was published in 2013 by Unsolicited Press. She is currently working on two collections of nature poetry, one which features the landscape natural environment of New Mexico, and the second which consists of poems written while traveling and living in China. She frequently presents and lectures on Chinese culture in both China and the United States. Her poetry, flash fiction, and non-fiction have been published in various anthologies and collections. Other recent publications include the chapter “Becoming Confucian in America” in Confucianism Reconsidered: Insights for American and Chinese Education in the Twenty-First Century forthcoming from SUNY Press in 2018. She participated in an ecocriticism conference combining Chinese and North American scholars held by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment hosted by the University of Central Florida. Herron was honored to be selected for the first Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute held at the birthplace of Confucius in Shandong PRC. At home, she is an avid organic gardener and recently acquired a small flock of hens.

MemberAlenda Chang

Alenda Y. Chang is an Associate Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has been featured in Ant Spider BeeInterdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentQui Parle, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, and Ecozon@, and her first book Playing Nature: Ecology in Video Games (University of Minnesota Press, December 2019), develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games.

Along with Film and Media Studies professor Laila Shereen Sakr, Chang is also the co-founder of the digital media studio Wireframe (Music 1410). Wireframe was established to support collaborative and cutting-edge research and teaching in new media, with an emphasis on global human rights, social justice, and environmental concerns. Located adjacent to the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons, the studio provides a space for production and critical engagement across media including games, data visualization, installation art, virtual/augmented reality, projection mapping, performance and installation, livestreaming, 3D modeling, mobile apps, and social media.

MemberAlenda Chang

Alenda Y. Chang is an Associate Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has been featured in Ant Spider BeeInterdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentQui Parle, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, and Ecozon@, and her first book Playing Nature: Ecology in Video Games (forthcoming University of Minnesota Press), develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games. Along with Film and Media Studies professor Laila Shereen Sakr, Chang is also the co-founder of the digital media studio Wireframe (Music 1410). Wireframe was established to support collaborative and cutting-edge research and teaching in new media, with an emphasis on global human rights, social justice, and environmental concerns. Located adjacent to the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons, the studio provides a space for production and critical engagement across media including games, data visualization, installation art, virtual/augmented reality, projection mapping, performance and installation, livestreaming, 3D modeling, mobile apps, and social media.

Memberdavid41448

David Seamon (PhD, 1977, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts USA) is a Professor of Environment-Behavior and Place Studies in the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Trained in behavioral geography and environment-behavior research, he is interested in a phenomenological approach to place, architecture, environmental experience, and environmental design as place making. His books include: A Geography of the Lifeworld (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979/Routledge Revival series, 2015); The Human Experience of Space and Place (edited with Anne Buttimer, London: Croom Helm, 1980); Dwelling, Place and Environment: Toward a Phenomenology of Person and World (edited with Robert Mugerauer; New York: Columbia University Press, 1989); Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1993); and Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature (edited with Arthur Zajonc, Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998). Seamon’s A GEOGRAPHY OF THE LIFEWORLD was reprinted in Routledge’s “Revival” series in 2015. His book, LIFE TAKES PLACE, will be published by Routledge in 2018. He is editor of Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology, which celebrated its 25th year of publication in 2014. DOIs for many of my books, articles, and chapters are available at the ORCHID website at https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3709-7398 Dr. David Seamon, Architecture Department, Kansas State University, 211 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS. 66506-2901 USA. Tel 1-785-532-5953; triad@ksu.edu Most of his writings, including articles and book chapters, are available at: https://ksu.academia.edu/DavidSeamon

MemberJason Heppler

Dr. Jason Heppler is the Digital Engagement Librarian and Assistant Professor of History (by courtesy) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he leads initiatives in digital humanities, research data services, and digital community engagement. His first book, tentatively titled Suburban by Nature: Silicon Valley and the Transformation of American Environmental Politics, explores the postwar growth of the cities of Silicon Valley and the ways that their growth not only led to ecological disaster but introduced social inequality. While Silicon Valley’s high-tech companies were imagined as a clean and green alternative to industrialization, the growth, manufacturing, and economic activity introduced challenges to the region’s wildlife and its residents. Suburban by Nature looks at how local communities confronted these challenges and offers a case study for other high-tech regions seeking to balance nature and city. He earned his PhD in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and has held positions at Stanford University’s Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research and UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities.