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MemberMark George

Mark K. George is Professor of Bible and Ancient Systems of Thought at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado. His scholarship primarily treats the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and, within that corpus, the Pentateuch and narrative texts. The focus of his work is on ancient systems of thought operating within this literature, whether they be social systems and structures expressed through the practices and conceptions of space, or the creation of particular subjectivities and the ways in which individuals govern or conduct their lives. George is the author or editor of three books, including Israel’s Tabernacle as Social Space (SBL Press, 2009) and a number of articles and encyclopedia entries, including “Aniconism” in The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and the Arts (Oxford, 2016). His current project is a book titled Deuteronomy’s Subject: Governmentality and the Creation of “Israel,” an analysis of the systems and techniques by which Deuteronomy creates Israel as a governable subject, one that is loyal and docile. He also is learning natural language processing (NLP), which is opening up new avenues of research as well as new perspectives from which to examine ancient systems of thought.

MemberShiloh Drake

My research investigates the structure of the lexicon, how words and morphemes are processed, and how we arrive at meaning. I conduct this work with English-, Maltese-, and Arabic-speaking populations, which enables me to explore morphological and lexical processing not only in monolingual populations but also in bilingual populations. I am also interested in morphological processing in clinical populations, such as people with Specific Language Impairment, Williams Syndrome, primary progressive aphasia – semantic variant, and people who have suffered from traumatic brain injury.

MemberPedro Jesús Molina Muñoz

Pedro Jesus Molina Muñoz currently works at the Language Centre of the University of Cyprus. He holds a PhD in Greek Lexicography (University of Granada, Spain) and a Master degree in ICT tools in Languages teaching and processing. Their research interests are “Greek Lexicography”, “Greek Religion”, “Greek Mythology”, “Greek Rites”, “Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language”, “Language Learning and Teaching”, “CALL”, “ICT tools in Language acquisition” and “Languages in contact: interconnections and interferences”.

MemberJoseph Jakubowski

I teach music theory in the Harvard Music Department and research process and ambient music of the latter twentieth and early twenty-first centuries (minimalism, spectralism, electroacoustic, ambient). My goals are analytical: drawing on recent theories of event cognition, embodied cognition, and ecological perception, I investigate the in-time musical experience of form, time, meter, timbre, and meaning. I contextualize broad questions about the nature of musical experience in narrow instances of processual, spatial, and interactive musical experiences. I have recently published or presented research on the role of metric cognition in Grisey (MTO, 2018; SMT, 2019); aspects of embodiment and formal perception (Intégral, forthcoming); and the development of spectral community and discourse through memorials to Grisey (Spectralisms conference, 2019). I am currently developing a monograph investigating process and ambient thinking since 1950 across genres and styles, from Stockhausen and Messiaen to Hans Abrahamsen and Laurie Spiegel. The book’s working title (quoting a Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith track) is “Existence in the Unfurling”: Theorizing Process and Ambient Music, 1950-2020.