Search

MemberRobert Baum

RCB is a philosopher from Long Island, New York. He is the author of ITSELF (Atropos, 2011) and THOUGHTRAVE: AN INTERDIMENSIONAL CONVERSATION WITH LADY GAGA (Atropos, 2016). He is a writer, teacher, composer, director, producer, and entrepreneur fast at work on creating planetary education curriculum (cradle to grave) grounded in the work of William Irwin Thompson and Gilles Deleuze. He is also the founder and CEO of the forthcoming N1Studios (Houston, L.A., and Manhattan).

MemberBill Hughes

…Open Graves, Open Minds Project, Uni. of Herts., University of Sheffield alumnus….
…Open Graves, Open Minds Project
In the Open Graves, Open Minds Project, we unearthed depictions of the vampire and the undead in literature, art, and other media, before embracing shapeshifters and other supernatural beings and their world…
…http://www.opengravesopenminds.com…
… and John Miller (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2017), pp. 227‒49.

Introduction (with Sam George) to ‘Open Graves, Open Minds’: Representations of Vampires and the Undead from the Enlightenment to the Present Day, ed. by Sam …

Bill Hughes was awarded a PhD in English Literature in 2010 from the University of Sheffield on communicative rationality and the Enlightenment dialogue in relation to the formation of the English novel. His research interests are in eighteenth-century literature; cultural and literary theory, particularly Raymond Williams, the Bakhtin circle, and the Frankfurt school; genre theory; aesthetics; intertextuality and the Semantic Web; and paranormal romance. He is co-founder, with Dr Sam George, of the Open Graves, Open Minds: Vampires and the Undead in Modern Culture Project at the University of Hertfordshire. He has publications out or forthcoming on Jane Austen, Elizabeth Hamilton, Frances Burney, Sydney Owenson, Bernard Mandeville, Maria Edgeworth, and Charlotte Smith. Bill has also published on Richard Hoggart, with contributions in Richard Hoggart and Cultural Studies, ed. by Sue Owen (Palgrave, 2008), and Richard Hoggart: Culture and Critique, ed. by Michael Bailey and Mary Eagleton (Critical, Cultural and Communications Press, 2011). In addition, he is researching contemporary vampire literature and paranormal romance, co-editing (with Dr George) and contributing to two collections: ‘Open Graves, Open Minds’: Vampires and the Undead from the Enlightenment to the Present (Manchester University Press, 2013); and In the Company of Wolves: Werewolves, Wolves, and Wild Children (Manchester University Press, 2020) and with articles forthcoming on the eighteenth-century novel and paranormal romance. This apparently disparate research is not unfocused; it has at its core Bill’s concerns with the Enlightenment as viewed through the theory of Habermas and the Marxist tradition.

MemberNina Janz

…PhD in History and Cultural Anthropology, University of Hamburg (2019), Thesis: “The German Soldier Graves between Heroic Glorification and Signs of Reconciliation – Historical and Cultural Case Studies about the War Death based on Germ…
…idueller Gräberfürsorge und nationalsozialistischem Totenkult (Hill of the Dead and Forest Cemeteries – The Graves and Cemeteries for fallen soldiers during World War II between individual grave care and the National Socialist N…

I am a Research Associate in the Project in History of Justice. As an archivist, I am researching and inventorying relevant documents for the project. I provide our team with relevant documents and prepares them for the digitalizing and virtual exhibition. I worked as an archivist at the German Federal Archive, in Koblenz and Berlin and at the Military Archive in Freiburg, where I managed requests and inquiries concerning the Wehrmacht, WW II and the fate of POW and other Nazi victims. I supported projects in digitalizing and preservation of documents and worked in a project of the German Historical Moscow to digitalize records of Soviet POW. After my archival career, I began my doctorate at the University of Hamburg in cultural anthropology about the impact of death and violence and the memory of WW II in the post-war period in Germany and Russia. My research focus lies on the commemoration aspects of military dead/war dead and war cemeteries in Germany and Russia, the Holocaust in Eastern Europe and on cultural aspects on the Wehrmacht and military violence during WW II. And secondly, my research interests cover the classical historical research in archives and libraries, digital methods and innovations and the questions of digital preservation and accessibility of historical documents.

MemberJens Notroff

Studied Prehistoric Archaeology at the Free University of Berlin under Prof. Hänsel and Prof. Teržan, where I finished studies in 2009 achieving the degree of Magister Artium. Main focus of research is the European Bronze Age, especially burial customs and material culture in view of the representation of prestige and social hierarchy, closely related to my interest in places of cult and ritual respectively the question of their archaeological evidence. Dissertation deals with the phenomenon of miniature swords in the Nordic Bronze Age and the role of these symbolic arms as markers of social rank. From Montelius’ Period IV onwards, miniature swords are found in burials while their larger pendants are mostly (but not exclusively) connected to depositions. Other than stated before, miniature swords are not displacing the large arms as grave goods completely – when they are disappearing from burials in Period V this also means the end of the Bronze Age miniature sword phenomenon in the North. Second field of research is the Pre-Pottery Neolithic and beginning sedentism as well as the development of early complex societies; affiliated with the Göbekli Type research project of the German Archaeological Institute’s Orient Department, excavating the oldest yet known monumental architecture – an early cultic centre or gathering place of hunter-gatherer groups near Şanlıurfa in south-eastern Anatolia.

MemberVenetria Patton

Dr. Venetria K. Patton is Head of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, Professor of English and African American Studies . From 2003-2015, she served as Director of African American Studies and Research Center at Purdue. She earned her B.A. in English from the University of La Verne and her M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of California-Riverside. Dr. Patton’s teaching and research focus on African American and Diasporic Women’s Literature. In 2003, she won two teaching awards: the Annis Chaiken Sorensen Distinguished Teaching Award in the Arts and Humanities and the College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Patton is the author of The Grasp That Reaches Beyond the Grave: the Ancestral Call in Black Women’s Texts (SUNY, 2014), Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women’s Fiction (SUNY, 2000), the Co-editor of Double-Take: A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology (Rutgers, 2001) and editor of Teaching American Literature: Background Readings (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006). Her essays have appeared in Black Studies and Women’s Studies journals as well as the essay collections, Postcolonial Perspectives on Women Writers From Africa, the Caribbean, and the US (Africa World Press, 2003), White Scholars/African American Texts (Rutgers UP, 2005), and Imagining the Black Female Body: Reconciling Image in Print and Visual Culture (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). She is also the editor of the fall 2011 issue of Black Women, Gender, and Families and co-editor of the spring 2004 issue of The Black Scholar. Dr. Patton is a former Chair of the Purdue Black Caucus of Faculty and Staff and is a former board member of the Hanna Community Center and the National Council for Black Studies.

MemberKirsty Millican

… Oxford: Hadrian Books. British Archaeological Reports British Series 623.

Papers

Millican, K., Goodchild, H. and Graves-McEwan, D. 2017 Monuments and Landscape: investigating a prehistoric monument complex at Lochbrow, Dumfries and G…

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.