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MemberPadmini Ray Murray

Padmini Ray Murray (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is the founder of Design Beku.: a collective that emerged from a desire to explore how technology and design can be decolonial, local, and ethical. Padmini established the first degree level digital humanities programme in India at the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology where she was course director from 2016-2018. She was the recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Unbox Fellowship (2012-13) and the co-investigator with Claire Squires on The Book Unbound, also funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. She is currently co-investigator on Gendering the Smart City with Professor Ayona Dutta, and the digital lead on Two Centuries of Indian Print, a project in collaboration with the British Library and Jadavpur University. She served as a trustee for Wikimedia UK from 2013-2014, and led a research project on platform governance and design for the Ekstep Foundation in 2018. As a creative practitioner, Padmini creates new media work which reflects her research and interests, such as Darshan Diversion (with KV Ketan and Joel Johnson), a feminist videogame about the Sabarimala temple controversy (2016); Halt The Hate (with Pratyush Raman) an interactive database of crimes against minorities for Amnesty India (2017) and is currently working on Visualising Cybersecurity – a Hewlett funded project that aims to alter how cybersecurity is depicted and discussed in the media (with the Centre for Internet and Society and Paulanthony George), and A is for AI: A Dictionary of AI (with Pratyush Raman, 2020). Padmini’s most recent published work focuses on how corporate online space, commit and perpetuate epistemological violence against the marginalised, through collusions of infrastructure and the interface.

MemberAmir Rahdari

Amir is one of the top 25 youngest world leaders in sustainable business (2degrees), a Science Sentinel (publons), world’s young researcher nominee (Antwerp), and He is a sustainability researcher and CSR consultant, an external reviewer for several Int. academic journals (JCR & Scopus), a research contributor to leading Sustainability platforms. He has published with JCLP, Scandinavian J. Man., Fuzzy Eco. Rev., & Soc. Resp. J. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Amir_Rahdari

MemberGregor Wolbring

Associate Professor University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, Community Health Sciences, Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Interests Ability Studies (ability, ability expectation  and ableism ethics and governance), disability studies, social, ethical, legal, economic, environmental, cultural and governance issues of new, emerging and converging sciences and technologies (S&T) such as nanoscale S&T, cognitive sciences, neuromorphic engineering, genetics, synthetic biology, robotics, brain computer interfaces, human  enhancement; impact of S&T on marginalized populations, especially disabled people; sports; human security, global health, health- (technology assessment, law, care and policies), sustainability studies; conflict studies; ecohealth, climate, water and energy issues and bioethics issues, http://www.crds.org/research/faculty/Gregor_Wolbring2.shtml

MemberMaria Seger

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. My research and teaching interests include early and nineteenth-century US literature, African American literature, US ethnic literatures, and critical race and ethnic studies. As a literary and cultural studies scholar, I am broadly interested in the violence of racial capitalism in US literature and culture. My work primarily deals with how violence arises out of and impacts capitalist social relations and ideological production, especially as it relates to notions of selfhood, ownership, and state power across the long nineteenth century. Right now, I’m at work on my book project, At All Costs: Extralegal Violence and Liberal Democracy in US Culture, which examines extralegal violence not as a lawless force that threatened American liberal-democratic governance but instead as emerging from and further entrenching the conditions that governance set.