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MemberDaylanne K. English

Interests: African American literature and culture, Afrofuturism, digital humanities (DH), the “post-monograph,” SCALAR and other publishing platforms for media-rich, purely digital projects. I am currently at work on two book-length projects, a DH project on Afrofuturism with the working title A Genealogy of Afrofuturism and a print monograph on the subject of the afterlife in African American literature and music, with the working title Soul Sounds. My first two book-length projects were print monographs, “Each Hour Redeem”: Time and Justice in African American Literature (2013) and Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (2004). I am a Professor of English at Macalester College in St. Paul, MN.

MemberPaige Morgan

Paige Morgan is the Digital Humanities Librarian at the University of Miami. Before joining the University of Miami she held a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University in Ontario. She completed her PhD in English and Textual Studies at the University of Washington, where she developed the Demystifying Digital Humanities curriculum with Sarah Kremen-Hicks and Brian Gutierrez through a grant from the Simpson Center for the Humanities. Paige’s research interests include data modeling for humanities subjects, linked open data, social infrastructure for digital scholarship, emotional labor in tech contexts. She has served as a consultant and data wrangler on a variety of projects, including the CLIR microgrant project Identifying Early Modern Books (IdEMB). She teaches workshops and short courses on DH at training events such as DHSI and DH@Guelph. You can find her writing on topics related to digital humanities and libraries, as well as 18th and 19th century English poetry in journals such as Romanticism, Romantic Circles, and DH+Lib.

MemberLeigh Bonds

As Ohio State’s Digital Humanities Librarian, I support the campus digital humanities network, consulting with faculty and graduate students on research and curricula, collaborating on projects, and coordinating learning opportunities for digital methods and tools. I publish on DH librarianship practices and on the celebrated British Romantic writer Mary Robinson, and I apply digital humanities methods to textual scholarship in my research.

MemberKathi Inman Berens

I am a scholar of digital humanities, electronic literature and “playable books,” digital-born, game-like stories  in touch environments like tablets and phones. My appointment is half DH, half book publishing.  I work also on digital pedagogy.  I curated the “Interface” keyword in MLA’s first open access publication, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities. On Twitter: @kathiiberens

MemberKirstyn Leuner

Dr. Kirstyn J. Leuner is Assistant Professor of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her Ph.D. in Romantic-era literature at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her research interests include literature of the long 18th century, digital humanities (DH), women’s writing, media history, and romanticism. She has published essays on Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Rodolphe Töpffer’s earliest comic strips, markup languages, and book history. She directs the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, a multi-institutional DH project that studies Francis Stainforth’s library, the largest private library of women’s writing collected in the 19th century. She is also a board member of and webmistress for the British Women Writers Association and an advisory board member for Romantic Circles Pedagogies. See her new faculty profile on SCU’s English Department website. When not writing or teaching, she is probably rock climbing or getting lost on a trail run.

MemberAmy Earhart

Amy E. Earhart is Associate Professor of English and affiliated faculty of Africana Studies at Texas A&M University. Earhart’s work has focused on building infrastructure for digital humanities work, embedding digital humanities projects within the classroom, and tracing the history and futures of dh, with a particular interest in the way that dh and critical race studies intersect. Earhart has been particularly concerned with representing a diverse history of digital humanities, as is the case with projects The Millican Massacre, 1868, DIBB: The Digital Black Bibliographic Project, and “Alex Haley’s Malcolm X: ‘The Malcolm X I knew’ and notecards from The Autobiography of Malcolm X” (a collaborative project with undergraduate and graduate students published in Scholarly Editing). Earhart has published scholarship on a variety of digital humanities topics, with work that includes a monograph Traces of Old, Uses of the New: The Emergence of Digital Literary Studies (U Michigan Press 2015), a co-edited collection The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age (U Michigan Press 2010), and a number of articles and book chapters in volumes including the Debates in Digital Humanities series, DHQ, Textual Cultures, and Humanities and the Digital.