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MemberPadmini Ray Murray

Padmini Ray Murray (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is the founder of Design Beku.: a collective that emerged from a desire to explore how technology and design can be decolonial, local, and ethical. Padmini established the first degree level digital humanities programme in India at the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology where she was course director from 2016-2018. She was the recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Unbox Fellowship (2012-13) and the co-investigator with Claire Squires on The Book Unbound, also funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. She is currently co-investigator on Gendering the Smart City with Professor Ayona Dutta, and the digital lead on Two Centuries of Indian Print, a project in collaboration with the British Library and Jadavpur University. She served as a trustee for Wikimedia UK from 2013-2014, and led a research project on platform governance and design for the Ekstep Foundation in 2018. As a creative practitioner, Padmini creates new media work which reflects her research and interests, such as Darshan Diversion (with KV Ketan and Joel Johnson), a feminist videogame about the Sabarimala temple controversy (2016); Halt The Hate (with Pratyush Raman) an interactive database of crimes against minorities for Amnesty India (2017) and is currently working on Visualising Cybersecurity – a Hewlett funded project that aims to alter how cybersecurity is depicted and discussed in the media (with the Centre for Internet and Society and Paulanthony George), and A is for AI: A Dictionary of AI (with Pratyush Raman, 2020). Padmini’s most recent published work focuses on how corporate online space, commit and perpetuate epistemological violence against the marginalised, through collusions of infrastructure and the interface.

MemberAgata Lulkowska

Interdisciplinary researcher, photographer and filmmaker. Agata Lulkowska holds a practice-based PhD in film and Latin American studies from Birkbeck, University of London. Her research focuses on the politics of visual representation among the Arhuaco community from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. She used collaborative filmmaking as a method. Lulkowska also holds Master’s Degree in Film and Media Studies at Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland, unfinished MA in Film Direction at Silesian University, Katowice, Poland, and a First Class Honours degree in Digital Media Arts at London South Bank University. Alongside her research work, she actively exhibits her visual work in wide international circles such as Tokyo, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, Bologna. Lulkowska’s research addresses questions of representation, otherness, and intercultural communication. She is particularly interested in the way film and video circulate in international circles, and how the aspect of communication transcends the cultural barriers. She lived and worked on three different continents, and she is trilingual.

MemberZachary Kaiser

In my work, which critically engages with my background as a designer working in the tech industry, I take up the mantle of the artist-as-experimenter[1]—questioning “the limits of preconstituted fields… along with the accepted criteria of judgment by which they would be held to account”[2]—in order to critique Graphic Design’s participation in the distribution of the sensible[3]—the delimiting of sensory experience that determines how we participate as political subjects. Graphic Design and User Experience Design guide us as we experience the world, allowing us to perceive some things while concealing others, and, therefore, shaping our modes of participation. In my creative work, I render the invisible visible, illuminating the politics of design in technology, as well as the ideas about the future embedded within our technologies themselves. I seek to contextualize, critique, and, maybe optimistically, modify the way that Design distributes the sensible, the way it shapes our understanding of ourselves as political subjects through our technologies, and how this circumscribes the way we imagine the future. To do so, I carve an intellectual space that utilizes a constellation of theories and methods from the fine arts, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Cultural Studies, Media Studies, and Philosophy. [1] Lyotard, Jean-François. 2003. “The tomb of the intellectual,” in Jean-François Lyotard: Political Writings. London: UCL Press, 3. [2] Hall, Gary. 2016. The Uberfication of the University. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 49. [3] Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible. New York: Continuum.