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MemberAlexsandra Mitchell

Alexsandra Mitchell is a Brooklyn-based international research scholar whose work explores the African Diaspora, spirituality, and the arts. She presently serves as a reference librarian and an archivist at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library.  Prior to joining the staff here in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division, Alexsandra was a lecturer at New York University’s Gallatin School for Individualized Study, and worked with institutions such as National Geographic Television, The Library of Congress, The West African Research Center in Dakar, Senegal, The New York Historical Society, and The Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, New York. Her many fellowships and awards include a National Diversity in Libraries Conference travel award, The Academy Awards Documenting Cinema Film Librarians Conference travel award, and two University of Virginia’s Rare Book School scholarships. Alexsandra is curator of the Schomburg Center’s, “Live From the Reading Room: Correspondence” podcast series, ‘Live From the Archive’ programming series, and The Schomburg Center’s community archives program, ‘Everyday Archives’, and a first year doctoral student in Cornell University’s Africana Studies program. . She is co-author of Research Techniques and Strategies for the Study of Black Writings, Rowman & Littlefield and a contributor to Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in Library and Information Science, both forthcoming.

MemberJordan Meyerl

I am a History MA student on the Archives track at UMass Boston. I have a wide variety of interests ranging from queer theory to ecocriticism. I am especially interested with the intersections of such theories with speculative fiction and fantasy. In terms of archives, I am focused on the intersections of privacy in our digital age, especially when digitizing the materials of marginalized communities.

MemberMichael Gossett

I am the senior program associate for the Public Knowledge (formerly: Scholarly Communications) program at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, where I develop proposals and review reports for a diverse portfolio of grants in the areas of digital publishing, data curation, digital preservation and web archiving, library reorganization, and community-based archives. I also co-lead the program’s emerging poetry initiative, which focuses on the preservation and access of literary audio archives. I am currently pursuing an MA in digital humanities at The Graduate Center (CUNY), where I study computational approaches to the creation, analysis, and preservation of poetry and poetry archives. I hold an MFA in poetry from the University of Maryland at College Park and a BA in English from Rhodes College.

MemberHenriette Roued-Cunliffe

I am an associate professor in the Section of Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM), Department of Communication, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. I teach, research, and write about digital heritage, such as:

  • open data in the heritage sector
  • participatory heritage communities online (like family historians)
  • GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) openness and online interaction

MemberEmily Kader

I am the Rare Book Research Librarian at Wilson Special Collections Library, which is part of University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I hold a PhD in English from Emory University, where I studied Irish and Appalachian literature and folklore. My current scholarship focuses on twentieth century book history in underrepresented communities as well as radical empathy in the special collections classroom. In my current position at UNC, I support research and teaching with rare books, archives, and special collections.  

MemberChristopher Estrada

  I am an Assistant Professor in the Portuguese program in Romance and Classical Studies at MSU, where I also teach in the Integrated Arts and Humanities (IAH) program.  My most recent research has been ethnographic and archival fieldwork on an improvised sung poetry, music, and carnival tradition called maracatu de baque solto in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, where I lived from 2008-2012.  I have also done fieldwork on diasporic immigrant communities in southwest and south Florida, and on community organizing among Puerto Rican activists in Humboldt Park, Chicago. I am currently piloting an IAH course that I designed, Music, Society, and the State in Latin America and the Caribbean, which looks at how patterns of racial and economic inequality, migration, and transnational flows of ideas and practices throughout the region are manifested in musical expression, and different ways that community building happens through that music.  In this course, I invite students to be my co-participants in exploring how these patterns play out across historical time and into the present day, and encourage them to connect these ideas to their lived experience. In the longer term, I’ve been working with collaborators in Brazil to put together a freely accessible digital archive of maracatu field recordings of the sung poetry contests (sambadas) and open rehearsals from the Mata Norte sugarcane zone of Pernambuco.  While these contests have gone on for about one hundred years, there is little in the way of detailed documentation on them.  Drawing on private collections of cassette recordings that go back to the 1980’s, as well as more recent digital recordings, the objective is to create a repository that can serve both the vibrant community of maracatu practitioners and enthusiasts, as well as others such as scholars or the musically curious who wish to know more about this fascinating scene and its deep history in the region.