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MemberGiorgio Buccellati

Giorgio Buccellati studied at the Catholic University (Milan, Italy), Fordam University and received his Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. He is Research Professor in the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and in the Department of History at UCLA. He founded the Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, of which he served as first director from 1973 until 1983 and where he is now Director of the Mesopotamian Lab. He is currently the Co-Director of the Urkesh/Mozan Archaeological Project as well as Director of IIMAS – The International Institute for Mesopotamian Area Studies and Director of AVASA – Associazione per la Valorizzazione dell’Archeologia e della Storia Antica. His research interests include the ancient languages, the literature, the religion, the archaeology and the history of Mesopotamia, as well as the theory of archaeology. His publications include site reports, text editions, linguistic and literary studies as well as on archaeological theory, historical monographs and essays on philosophy and spirituality. He has published a structural grammar of ancient Babylonian, two volumes on Mesopotamian civilization (on religion and politics; two more are forthcoming on literature as well as on art and architecture), a volume on archaeological theory dealing with the structural, digital and philosophical aspects of the archaeological record. He has authored two major scholarly websites on the archaeology of Urkesh and on archaeological theory. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he has traveled to Syria to study modern ethnography and geography for a better understanding of the history of the ancient Amorites. In his field work, he has developed new approaches to the preservation and presentation of archaeological sites and to community archaeology. He has spearheaded the Urkesh Extended Project, responding to the crisis of the war in Syria by maintaining a very active presence at the site. Giorgio Buccellati has worked for many years in the Near East, especially in Syria, Iraq and Turkey. Together with his wife, Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, he is co-director of the archaeological expedition to Tell Mozan/Urkesh in North-Eastern Syria. They work closely together both in the field and on the publication reports from their excavations, of which five volumes, plus audio-visual presentations, have appeared so far. They lead an international staff comprising colleagues and students from the US, Europe, the Near East and Asia and have given joint lectures on the excavations, and workshops on methods used, at major archaeological centers around the world as well as holding positions as visiting professors in various European universities.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberFrancesco Iacono

…0-250 BC” Accordia Research Papers XI, 95-118.

Chapters

In press (2019) “Neutron Activation Analysis of Aegean and Aegeanizing Ceramics from Roca Vecchia and the Circulation of Pottery in Southern Italy”, (with R. Jung, H. Mommsen and R. Guglielmino) in Atti dell’incontro di Studi di Roma, Poligrafo, Rome.

2018 “Marxist Archaeologies” in A. Gardner; M. Lake; U. Sommers, (eds.) Oxford Handbook of Archaeological Theory Oxford University Press, Oxford.

2017 “The exception and the rule. Making sense of the diversity in patterns of Aegean interaction in LBA Central Mediterranean”, in M. Fotiadis; R. Laffineur; Y. Lolos; A. Vlachopoulos (eds.) ΕΣΠΕΡΟΣ / ΗESPEROS: The Aegean seen from the West, Aegeum 33, 205-214.

2015 “Uno sguardo dall’esterno. Attività marinare e interazione nelle periferie…

I joined the Department of History, Culture and Civilization of the University of Bologna after winning the “Montalcini” program against the so-called “brain-drain” and after a long period of research at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge (first with a fellowship from the Institute for Aegean Prehistory and then with a Marie Slodowska Curie IF). Previously, I had earned a Ph.D. at the Institute of Archeology, University College London, funded by the AHRC and the British School at Athens. My research interests range from prehistory and archeology of the Mediterranean (with particular attention to the Bronze Age), to social theory (in particular Marxist archeology) to the use of applications based on graph-theory, to cultural heritage studies (with specific attention to the so-called “difficult heritage”), and, finally, the history of the archaeological thought.

MemberMark Sussman

American Fiction (Postbellum – WWII), African American Lit, Novel Theory, Media Archaeology, Conceptual PoeticsPhD: The Graduate Center, CUNY (2014)
Dissertation: “Common Knowledge: the Epistemology of American Realism” Peer-reviewed publications forthcoming from Novel and MELUS
Essays, reviews, and criticism in The Believer, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Bookforum, Capital New York, Souciant, and Jewcy

MemberCaroline Heitz

  I am an archaeologist working on prehistoric wetland sites and the archaeology of alpine spaces in the Circum Alpine region. I did my studies in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology, Archaeological Science, Social Anthropology and the History of Eastern Europe. Accordingly, I have a deep interest in inter- and transdisciplinarity research. In my PhD thesis titling ‘Ceramics beyond Cultures: A praxeological approach to mobility, entanglements and transformation in the northern Alpine space (3950-3800 BC)’, I combined different thing, action, cultural and social theories with qualitative and quantitative methods of archaeology and archaeometry. While this project aimed at inquiring the role of spatial mobility for transformations in Neolithic pottery production and consumption practices, my latest research is focussed on the mutuality of human-environment-relations.  

MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberJames M. Harland

I work on the history and archaeology of late antique and early medieval Western Europe, specifically Britain and Gaul, with a focus on processes of transformation and ethnic change. My broader interests lie in ethnic identity, transformation and continuity, and military and economic history, in addition to the philosophical and ethical implications of the study of these fields and their reception and misuse in the modern day, drawing upon continental philosophy and literary theory to explore these concerns. My doctoral thesis was a critical historiography of the study of ethnic identity through archaeological means in late and post-Roman Britain, making use of ethnic sociology and continental philosophy to examine and interrogate the epistemological foundations which underpin this subject of study. More information about my research, publications, CV and teaching can be found on my hcommons site, here.